• A Minor Blues Improvisation
  • Started by Kajetan Zduniak
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A Minor Blues Improvisation
on: January 25, 2019, 20:49:34
Hey guys i wanted to show my trail of improvising in that style !
Feedback is really important i count on much more experienced players than me but other guys can rate me too !


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #1 on: January 27, 2019, 19:08:35
Hey guys i wanted to show my trail of improvising in that style !
Feedback is really important i count on much more experienced players than me but other guys can rate me too !


Hey @Kajetan Zduniak  nice playing! I really appreciate the way you are always seeking to improve. The world would be a better place if more people were like that.
I know nothing of guitar technique other that my gigs with excellent players, so I can't help you there.
I am, however, a pretty experienced improviser on other instruments.

Good Work:
Use of blues language
Riff-age (if that's a word ?  :)  ...IDK)
Ideas w/out too much repetition  ... but enough to make it right
Melodic playing with good chordal accentuation
Nice tone ( to me ...  again I'm no guitarist ... but I like it)

Suggestions:
Locking in your Rhythm ... rhythm is king   ... lock in those triples! You're almost there!  :)
If playing duple ( i.e swing ) accentuate the second eighth note to push it to the next
Maybe you can figure out a way to double time it occasionally? But keep it your own style.
Tell the story ... plan ahead a beginning, middle and end  ... it seems like you do this anyway but maybe a little more?  :)

I hope what I wrote can be of some help to you. Keep up the good work!  :)
Bill
Songwriter, Keyboards, Arranger, Producer & Engineer for November Sound

November Sound is based on the Mother, Father & Son musical trio of Melissa, Bill & Will. I'm the father so anything I post will have my wife singing and/or my son playing percussion.


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #2 on: January 27, 2019, 19:12:16
Hey @Kajetan Zduniak  maybe I should take back that "double time it" comment?  You are kind of doing that around 4:30 or so  ..... maybe just longer phrases in that mode?  :)
(IDK - you asked for feedback and I was trying to help. )


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #3 on: January 27, 2019, 20:15:17
 ::heart::
Hey @Kajetan Zduniak  maybe I should take back that "double time it" comment?  You are kind of doing that around 4:30 or so  ..... maybe just longer phrases in that mode?  :)
(IDK - you asked for feedback and I was trying to help. )
Thank you for your time and feedback ! i definitely want to improve my rhythm playing i want to learn new licks too and tell better stories with my phrasing :)


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Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #4 on: January 28, 2019, 03:07:24
Like @Bill from November Sound , I only try to help, so please @Kajetan Zduniak take my words in this way.

The simplest things are the most difficult. Because the low tempo and the matter of fact delivery by the old proís in the field there are literally thousands of people who either totally focused on the blues or made serious attempts to have a go at it.

The blues is much more about telling a story than any other type of music.
The guy who understood this more than any other musician, was B.B. King.
Almost every solo he played, was singable. If you listen to the old guys (and girls) from the blues and jazz scene, youíll notice how their lips are moving when they play. Even when someone else is playing.

Ben Webster even had songs that were called La De Da. If you asked (like I did, and I was 11 or so at the time), Ben, what is a la de da, he would answer that  the name was a reminder of how the song started. Singing/humming in his case, while doing the dishes.

So, if you want to improve your blues playing, the best way to do it would be to
- have you backing running
- play the barest minimum of chords
- and sing or hum the kind of melody you fancy
- and donít forget that silence is music too
- and youíve got the humbuckers to keep a silence silent

So, if youíve got the outline of what you want to play, you can be more adventurous and use the hummed melody to fall back to.

I hope you will take this as a reason to try further bluesy adventures, because I liked your earlier video s too.
Keep it up!
Kind regards, Gus


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #5 on: January 29, 2019, 16:04:46
Like @Bill from November Sound , I only try to help, so please @Kajetan Zduniak take my words in this way.

The simplest things are the most difficult. Because the low tempo and the matter of fact delivery by the old proís in the field there are literally thousands of people who either totally focused on the blues or made serious attempts to have a go at it.

The blues is much more about telling a story than any other type of music.
The guy who understood this more than any other musician, was B.B. King.
Almost every solo he played, was singable. If you listen to the old guys (and girls) from the blues and jazz scene, youíll notice how their lips are moving when they play. Even when someone else is playing.

Ben Webster even had songs that were called La De Da. If you asked (like I did, and I was 11 or so at the time), Ben, what is a la de da, he would answer that  the name was a reminder of how the song started. Singing/humming in his case, while doing the dishes.

So, if you want to improve your blues playing, the best way to do it would be to
- have you backing running
- play the barest minimum of chords
- and sing or hum the kind of melody you fancy
- and donít forget that silence is music too
- and youíve got the humbuckers to keep a silence silent

So, if youíve got the outline of what you want to play, you can be more adventurous and use the hummed melody to fall back to.

I hope you will take this as a reason to try further bluesy adventures, because I liked your earlier video s too.
Keep it up!
Kind regards, Gus
Thank you really much for your time @LePlongeur !
i definitely need to sing during my solos . As u said previously i have to tell a story!
This is the thing i heared from my teacher too .
I know that my chords aren't pure bluesy
On the video i am using CAGED system :) for me its one of the best ways to play over chords :)


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Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #6 on: January 29, 2019, 17:02:47
Not bad at all @Kajetan Zduniak ... in my day as guitarists we began with the blues when learning to play , nowadays I guess it's not always true.

Gus, @LePlongeur , is quite right about BB KIng, and he was the one guy I was going to suggest studying.  He was a master of saying so much with so few notes so a real challenge for you is to see how much you can get out of 3 or four notes at first and then build up from there. Bending is crucial as a stylistic effect as you often access those blues notes b3rd,  b5th , b7th that way.

Essential watching



Out of interest BB King often used major 6th not the flat 7th as discussed here by Andew Wasson. If you don't know the Creative Guitar Studio channel its well worth exploring. yuo can easily push that 6th up the b7 too.



The 'blues scale' as such can be thought of as a modified minor pentatonic scale with a few extra notes. A tip for you is you can easily move from major pentatonic to minor pentatonic / blues from one phrase to another and still sound bluesy using the same box patterns but just down four frets I think. With a standard 6th string box, say in A, your have your root note on the fifth, first finger, well you keep that root but it's now your forth finger on that A using one finger one fret. So minor pentatonic to major pentatonic.

I think I mix them up nowadays without even thinking about it and throw in so modal runs too. Jimmy Page added modal stuff I think t othe basic blues patterns.

To me Blues is all about the emotion and the story first and foremost. That is often achieved by what you don't play, as much as what you do. Those spaces, the tension and release is crucial.

Another tip, play a backing track and with a basic one position box just play the different notes of the scale and feel how they sound. What degree of tension. Once you have that in your brain you will start thinking phrases and your fingers will start reaching automatically for those notes.  The tension and release is the key to make a solo sing.

There are some very flash blues players but strangely often the best blues are the most simple in terms of speed / flair. Instead it's the connection with the emotion of the song.

So less is more and emotion is the key :-)

Hope this helps


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Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #7 on: January 31, 2019, 23:14:09
Hey @Kajetan Zduniak  .... I was thinking .... do you often get to play live with others?    ???
(If you lived around here I'd be saying, "Let's jam on Monday night.")  :)


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #8 on: February 01, 2019, 16:49:53
Hey @Kajetan Zduniak  .... I was thinking .... do you often get to play live with others?    ???
(If you lived around here I'd be saying, "Let's jam on Monday night.")  :)
Hey @Bill from November Sound !
No i dont
i have been playing maybe 3 times in school and one time half of year ago in a music club with unknown musicians :)
it was really stressful but i didnt break my character i wanted to feel pace to get the respect of other musicians hah
Majority of them were professionals so it was difficult
furthermore i couldnt set my amp because i hadnt been playing on amps like this and i was playing on total clean xd no clean crunch blues tone man xd totally new situation and i didnt want to fuck up hah


Re: A Minor Blues Improvisation
Reply #9 on: February 01, 2019, 16:57:40
Not bad at all @Kajetan Zduniak ... in my day as guitarists we began with the blues when learning to play , nowadays I guess it's not always true.

Gus, @LePlongeur , is quite right about BB KIng, and he was the one guy I was going to suggest studying.  He was a master of saying so much with so few notes so a real challenge for you is to see how much you can get out of 3 or four notes at first and then build up from there. Bending is crucial as a stylistic effect as you often access those blues notes b3rd,  b5th , b7th that way.

Essential watching



Out of interest BB King often used major 6th not the flat 7th as discussed here by Andew Wasson. If you don't know the Creative Guitar Studio channel its well worth exploring. yuo can easily push that 6th up the b7 too.



The 'blues scale' as such can be thought of as a modified minor pentatonic scale with a few extra notes. A tip for you is you can easily move from major pentatonic to minor pentatonic / blues from one phrase to another and still sound bluesy using the same box patterns but just down four frets I think. With a standard 6th string box, say in A, your have your root note on the fifth, first finger, well you keep that root but it's now your forth finger on that A using one finger one fret. So minor pentatonic to major pentatonic.

I think I mix them up nowadays without even thinking about it and throw in so modal runs too. Jimmy Page added modal stuff I think t othe basic blues patterns.

To me Blues is all about the emotion and the story first and foremost. That is often achieved by what you don't play, as much as what you do. Those spaces, the tension and release is crucial.

Another tip, play a backing track and with a basic one position box just play the different notes of the scale and feel how they sound. What degree of tension. Once you have that in your brain you will start thinking phrases and your fingers will start reaching automatically for those notes.  The tension and release is the key to make a solo sing.

There are some very flash blues players but strangely often the best blues are the most simple in terms of speed / flair. Instead it's the connection with the emotion of the song.

So less is more and emotion is the key :-)

Hope this helps
hey @MrBouzouki
I am really grateful for such a nice feedback and tips
i know that my playing is too thick and i should play less notes just like BB.
I also should play more in major keys and i heared it from my teacher u know to be ready for jams and unexpected keys u know to go beyond my comfort zone.Thank you for reminding me that i should sing while playing :) thanks for saying that phrases should mix themselves into bigger phrase :)
Kind regards,Kajetan