Songwriters in the Kitchen!

Board index => The kitchen café => Topic started by: MrBouzouki on April 11, 2018, 19:15:55

Title: Amazing YouTube Channel - "Take a Break From the Present"
Post by: MrBouzouki on April 11, 2018, 19:15:55
Totally off-topic but hey, that's what this section is for.

Whilst researching the illuminate manuscript "The Lindisfarne Chronicles" I stumbled across this fascinating YouTube channel.

Basically it has lots of videos of browsing through Medieval Manuscript Facsimiles that have been digitised from the originals.

As I posted for my friends on Facebook ...

For anybody who like books, art, history, or all three, ... and want to lose yourself in the past for a while, I highly recommend this YouTube Channel.
The average person will never get to see just how beautiful some of these manuscripts are. Have a browse you may find it quite illuminating ;-)

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIQzfxeoUhB-7ar00K2fD0A
Title: Re: Amazing YouTube Channel - "Take a Break From the Present"
Post by: Dutchbeat on April 11, 2018, 20:50:10
@MrBouzouki

great link!!!!  :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Amazing YouTube Channel - "Take a Break From the Present"
Post by: LePlongeur on April 12, 2018, 07:42:57
Funny that you post this at this specific moment.

Because at this moment, the Catharine Convent (museum) in Utrecht has a huge exposition totally dedicated to miniatures.
And those are the sometimes minuscule decorations at the/on the top of written pages of right at the bottom of those old books.

Plus my dad always calligraphed (get the impression the apple mafia disapprove of the use of this word) even his shopping lists, so I’ll be in good company there.

So thanks for posting this. I definitely are going to follow up on that link.
Kind regards, Gus
Title: Re: Amazing YouTube Channel - "Take a Break From the Present"
Post by: MrBouzouki on April 16, 2018, 20:02:28
Cheers @Dutchbeat amd @LePlongeur - glad you like the link.

It' nice doing research for musical ideas because you never know what you might find on the Internet. It's nice to think cultural things like this are made available for people to see, albeit facsimiles,
as opposed to being locked away and never really seen by many.

I've been reading up about the Lindisfarne Gospels and ironically that's how it was thought of back in the day, a glance by a pilgrim was probably the only way to view it then as it was a symbol or totem of the word of God.