Songwriters in the Kitchen!

Board index => The kitchen café => Topic started by: DonMar on May 14, 2019, 08:26:00

Title: Melody creation: avoiding 'avoid' notes
Post by: DonMar on May 14, 2019, 08:26:00
I happened to come across this article a few minutes ago. Though I'm not a musician, I found it interesting. Do any of you composers here take 'avoid notes' into account?

https://blog.holistic-songwriting.com/2016/06/21/avoid-notes/

Donna
Title: Re: Melody creation: avoiding 'avoid' notes
Post by: Jambrains on May 14, 2019, 11:15:04
Not in the sense that I analyze melody vs chords but I guess most of us avoid them intuitively since a) they sound awful and b) as pointed out in the article, they are difficult to sing.
Title: Re: Melody creation: avoiding 'avoid' notes
Post by: Leonard Scaper on May 14, 2019, 12:17:55
I guess most of us avoid them intuitively since a) they sound awful and b) as pointed out in the article, they are difficult to sing.

Yeah...I have never actually written a melody, per se. I do know what notes tend to sound bad together, though......well, sometimes I know.  ;)
Title: Re: Melody creation: avoiding 'avoid' notes
Post by: oorlab on May 14, 2019, 12:33:11
Interesting subject @DonMar @Jambrains @Leonard Scaper I would translate : "Avoid notes" that “rub” against the harmony" - into intervals to avoid. Depends on the style too I guess. Doowop will have more avoid intetrvals than jazz.
Title: Re: Melody creation: avoiding 'avoid' notes
Post by: MrBouzouki on May 17, 2019, 10:53:16
An interesting article @DonMar .

From my viewpoint it's all about the degree of dissonance that is acceptable to you the composer, songwriter, singer and as @oorlab said it's as much about genre as anything. but also culture.

Our Western ears are trained from a young age to find pleasure in certain forms, with a degree of exotic additions depending upon genre. Contrast that with music that is a result of different cultures or musical tradition than the European one where the sound of that music is completely alien to your brain.  It can just sound 'too wrong' for our sensibilities.

So for music you want to write, you are constrained by familiarity, stylistic shackles, your musical knowledge to some extent and the desire to have your music accepted by others, particularly if you want to make a living out of it.

The interesting bit in all this is when you add words and storytelling on top of music. Now the brain is doing two things, it's hearing musical notes  but it might be more of a backdrop to a lyrical message or adventure. You now have a more complex experience when the language element is involved.

Different types of people might have wildly different reactions to the same piece of music. Some might almost zone out on the music as the lyric connects for them whilst others might almost gloss over the lyric because it has a cool riff or beat.

I find it fascinating to consider the difference between reciting a poem, singing 'a cappella' , a purely instrumental piece and what we recognise as a song with instrumental and verbal elements. The way the brain interprets all these forms is still a mystery which is part of the magic of music.