Songwriters in the Kitchen!

Board index => The kitchen cafť => Topic started by: jameswoolwine on August 03, 2019, 11:23:47

Title: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: jameswoolwine on August 03, 2019, 11:23:47
Hello,

Has anyone here ever signed a publishing deal?  I'm curious what  kind of deal can a beginning and unknown writer expect to receive.  Specifically, would be it standard to give up your copyright and publishing rights, and have to pay for half of the demo fees?  Any insights are appreciated.  Thanks for your time! - James
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: Bill from November Sound on August 03, 2019, 14:22:35
Hi @jameswoolwine  I don't know about this but I'm going tag a few members who might. I'm going to say don't give up copyright unless you have a really, really good reason to.
I wonder if @jameshargreaves  @Dara  or  @SteveAlton  could give you some insight? 
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: Dutchbeat on August 03, 2019, 16:10:10
hi @jameswoolwine i am also going to tag @budhabuilding , because he has a lot of experience with these kinds of agreements with online publishers
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: Dara on August 03, 2019, 17:06:39
Wow the website looks completely different to the last time I visited.  Iíll need to have a look around when I get a chance. 

A typical deal for someone starting out would be 50% publishing and 100% writers share. 

If a publisher wants to own the copyright they would offer an upfront fee to buyout the copyright.  Itís also common for a publisher to offer co-copyright deals.  In both cases the songwriter will still own 100% writers share in royalties.  ďOr at least they shouldĒ.  If the publisher has the copyright it means they will exploit the music exclusively, which can be a good thing.  Or horrible if itís just sitting there and you think you could have done more with it.     

If youíre starting out my advice would be to get your feet wet and self publish some music, try licensing your music through sites like audiojungle and pond 5, there is other good ones for bands and artists like music vine.

If I missed something or got something wrong feel free to correct me or add to it. 

Good luck!
 
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: budhabuilding on August 03, 2019, 19:09:12
Hi @jameswoolwine ,


@Dara is completely right.

One thing I would  add is: Never pay to get published or synced. They should always pay you to get your music out there....if you want to get good recordings ... invest time to make finished products or ask people to produce for you.


I released music on 6 different record companies. I had 2 record companies (metal and a ambient record companie) with a friend . And have more then 140 tracks synced with tv programs.

At the moment itís a very busy market for music. So I now do everything DIY.

Connect with real people and work together and collaborate.

Just my opinion.....  :doublebonk:

 
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: jameswoolwine on August 04, 2019, 17:02:26
Thank you all for sharing that information.
Title: Re: Pay for Play and Give Away Copyright?
Post by: LePlongeur on August 05, 2019, 09:16:42
Donít look at me for a real detailed answer.
In discussions like these, I alway miss the following aspect:

When starting, we tend to be grateful for our part of the deal, that is an outright business deal for the other side. Nothing wrong with that. But the other side often does a one sided job. They have the power to cancel under some circumstances, while on your side itís an indefinite agreement. So your chances to renegotiate are nil.

Look at what was signed by John Fogarty (Creedence Clearwater Revival). Since 1968 untill recently, Fantasy paid him next to nothing while he kept the whole label afloat.

For some 50 years!
So, my idea is:
Do what the kind people here suggest if a publisher wants to underwrite those ideas.
But make sure that you donít give away your rights to negotiate renewals in case you have the doubtful luck to get famous.

Good hunting!
Kind regards, Gus