• The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
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The Good: Technology has made it possible for nearly everyone to produce and share music to the world.

The Bad: Technology has made it possible for nearly everyone to produce and share music to the world.

The Ugly:  The quality of today's popular music.

The Good: Quality musical instruments and recording equipment is affordable.

The Bad: The streaming services.

The Ugly: The paltry revenue  artists are being paid.

The Good: Most commercial radio stations aren't playing much new music because nobody wants to hear it.

The Bad:  Autotune

The Ugly: Stream farms

The Good: Joe Bonamassa

The Bad: Kanye West

The Ugly: Kanye West

In the US. the record industry has always been corrupt and it still is but many years ago there were at least some people in A&R departments who recognized good music when they heard it. Commercial radio played music and singles and listeners got a chance to hear music and decide if they wanted to go to their local  record store and by it. The reason commercial radio is not playing new music is because nobody likes it.

Someone needs to help me out with the Good because I'm not seeing much good.

The Bad: Earbuds

The Bad: Fake drums

The Bad: Less organic instruments are being used.

The Bad: Most modern country.

The Bad: Harmonizers

The Bad: No more MTV and VH-1

The Bad: Prince, Tom Petty and Michael Jackson are gone.

The Bad: No more good songs.

The Bad: DJs

The Bad: EDM

Create!


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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #1 on: November 23, 2020, 13:04:15
A great call with this one @CGHound .... I agree with most of your choices, let me have a go ...

The Good: YouTube and other forums allow you to learn about how to play an instrument in a more convenient way than the past.

The Bad: As a result of the above, traditional music teachers are having a hard time of it

The Ugly: Even the online teachers aren't really making any real money. I wonder who is ?

The Good: Despite it all, people are still creating the music they want to make

The Bad: Outlets where they can play their own music are disappearing at an alarming rate (in the UK at least)

The Ugly: Venues generally want cover bands / artists, not original music played in their venues

The Good: The overall technique of some non-classical musicians has risen sharply due to more accessible instruction

The Bad: As a result of the above, and given the discipline required, this has diverted potential musicians from classical instrument tuition

The Ugly: Schools in the UK have insufficient funding to encourage the joy of playing an instrument or even singing

....some Good ehhhhh  @CGHound ..... ummmmmmm

The Good: Despite what some people say, all the good songs haven't already been written

The Good: Songwriting is still a thing, a form of expression that will come out even if it actively suppressed.

The Good: Music can always be used to find peace and contentment, a valuable commodity in troubled times

The Good: We are well overdue the creation of a new type of instrument, a new way of playing, it's just a matter of time 

The Good: Research has lead to the use of music in therapeutic ways. A great example in people with with Dementia / Alzheimer’s

The Good: Music just makes me smile  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

"Love and Life is all about connections"


Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #2 on: November 23, 2020, 21:55:03
I disagree with almost all of this @CGHound  .... eh maybe 93% of it ..... but still cool to see you with a profile avatar and I'm glad that you're someone who is open-minded enough to have this discussion.  :thumbsup:

Most people think what they think w/ no need to post and no need to dicuss.
Bill
Songwriter, Keyboards, Arranger, Producer & Engineer for November Sound

November Sound is based on the Mother, Father & Son musical trio of Melissa, Bill & Will. I'm the father so anything I post will have my wife singing and/or my son playing percussion.


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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #3 on: November 25, 2020, 00:03:22
I disagree with almost all of this @CGHound  .... eh maybe 93% of it ..... but still cool to see you with a profile avatar and I'm glad that you're someone who is open-minded enough to have this discussion.  :thumbsup:

Most people think what they think w/ no need to post and no need to dicuss.

Fact: Mechanical sales are practically nil.  CD's  sales are in the toilet.

Fact: Global music sales are around $20 billion and only a tiny percentage of that goes to the artist,

How much does Spotify pay for 1 million streams?

Now, if there were a total of 1 million streams on the platforms over the period, and your music generated 100,000 streams out of that million, your total payout would make $57 .

Here's the 411 on streaming payouts: https://soundcharts.com/blog/music-streaming-rates-payouts

The Music Modernization Act screws songwriters: https://erklaw.com/the-music-modernization-act-hurts-indie-songwriters/



Sorry, I like facts. ;D


Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #4 on: November 25, 2020, 01:04:49
Oh I just meant the list of what you thought was good, bad and ugly.   ;) 

@CGHound 

I don't ever see myself getting a million streams.  I think that's only for the "quality popular music of today" that you mentioned in your list.  ::)  ;D   


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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #5 on: November 25, 2020, 08:38:45
@CGHound, @Bill from November Sound  ... I think the modern 'music business' is an interesting topic to discuss.

Although I could say that I feel musicians have probably always struggled to earn a living throughout history in the 'business' of making and performing music, i.e. making a living from performing as against doing it for worship, pleasure and celebration.

Nowadays many people are passive consumers not active performers even if your performance was standing around a piano or singing in a church., it was more a participatory thing not so long ago.

Before 1878 when the first sound recordings were made there were mechanical means of producing recognisable tunes, musical boxes et al, but before then of course there was sheet music. According to Wikipedia ...

Quote
Music publishing did not begin on a large scale until the mid-15th century, when mechanical techniques for printing music were first developed. The earliest example, a set of liturgical chants, dates from about 1465, shortly after the Gutenberg Bible. Prior to this time, music had to be copied out by hand. This was a very labour-intensive and time-consuming process, so it was first undertaken only by monks and priests seeking to preserve sacred music for the church. The few collections of secular music that are extant were commissioned and owned by wealthy noblemen. Examples include the Squarcialupi Codex of Italian Trecento music and the Chantilly Codex of French Ars subtilior music. Hand copying persisted long after the invention of printing and music was widely disseminated in manuscript form well into the 18th century, both in personal copying and scribal publication.

All of this relates to the preservation of melodies, tunes and thoughts in lyrics,  for learning, study and performance by others to an audience. Maybe even for a degree of immortality to some degree as in all recorded history.

When you read about Turlough  O'Carolan ...

Quote
Turlough O'Carolan, also called Terence Carolan (born 1670, near Nobber, County Meath, Ireland, died March 25th, 1738, Alderford, County Roscommon), one of the last Irish harpist-composers and the only one whose songs survive in both words and music in significant number (about 220 of provable provenance are extant with an uncounted number apocryphally attributed).

The son of an iron founder, O'Carolan became blind from smallpox at the age of 18. He was befriended by a Mrs. MacDermott-Roe, the wife of his father's employer, who apprenticed him to a harper and supported him for the three years of his training,then gave him money, a guide, and a horse.As an itinerant harper, he travelled widely in Ireland. Although never considered a master performer, he was highly regarded as a
composer of songs and improvised verse. His tunes appeared widely in 18th-century collections.

you realise that the recording of music in printed form was quite often to do with the patronage of rich patrons, apparently he composed tunes for both protestant and catholic patrons. "Carolan bridges the gap between continental art music on the one hand, and the Gaelic harp and folk music on the other. At his best he wrote music that is distinctively Irish, yet has an international flavour as well."

Was O'Carolan the Elvis of his time, the poor boy made good? I guess many of the earlier harpers and musicians of the time were as good if not possibly better but maybe things like being blind focussed his desire to make music and maybe he was in the right pace at the right time?

Anyway, history aside, as technology has advanced, and the reproduction and storage of sound has got better, we are nowadays able to hear music as was performed at any time in written musical history and we can even make a guess at ancient music like that from the Seikilos epitaph.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikilos_epitaph

Nowadays, music has truly become much more of a commodity, to be bought and sold and with that has come all sorts of practices designed to enrich some and therefore deny others. Scarcity at one time meant music was special. Many on here can probably remember purchasing music, browsing the record shops, the thrill of the new album or single. The advent of world-wide simple distribution has made music more mundane, less special to many peoples ears. "Well it's just music isn't it"

Another side-effect of music as a unit is that if a certain stylistic pattern seems to do well then obviously the desire is to make more of it to capitalise on the popularity and generate more money.

Just like other artistic endeavours, a value is placed on making music to generate an income as opposed to making music as a shared activity or personal entertainment. It has moved beyond learning, study, celebration and even entertainment and become a unit.

When music is reduced in this way then the consumer comes to expect there to be negligible cost to listen to anything they want. The model of patronage to support artists from the past has largely collapsed, in part because of the the success in allowing anybody to easily create it. The number of artists alone nowadays is huge. Potentially great for the consumer, but a headache for the artist who wants a career as a result of their efforts.

I suppose my point in this long ramble is that we are at a point in time where supply of 'the unit' has become the overriding factor in our part of the world. Ownership of the product to supply is more important than the art itself. The music business has truly become the music supply business. It has become a utility company piping into the world of the consumer the sounds it thinks people want to hear.



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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #6 on: November 25, 2020, 09:47:08
Oh I just meant the list of what you thought was good, bad and ugly.   ;) 

@CGHound 

I don't ever see myself getting a million streams.  I think that's only for the "quality popular music of today" that you mentioned in your list.  ::)  ;D

There is a glut of music. Old music doens't go away. More and more music or stuff being passed off as music gets uploaded. If you want a lot of streams buy them from a stream farm. Fake listen are how rappers get so many clicks.


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Because of this fraud legit artists are getting overlooked and advertizers are getting ripped off.  The incentive is not to make good music but make a lot of music.  That's what the labels  want. If one wants a payday they'd be better off releasing a lot of mediocre "music" instead of a few  good  tracks. 

If someone steals your music good luck getting compensated. I had one stolen off of soundcloud and it took a lot of effort on my part to get streaming services to remove it.  Amazon makes you jump through hoops gangsters that they are and Google Play won't do anything. Finally, I located the thief and put the fear of God on him.     

It's one scam after another.  Soundcloud has stopped a lot of it on it's platform but for along time my account and email was getting bombarded with spammer scams..

Hopefully, someone with money and honor will create a streaming service that protects the artist and advertisers. 

I've lived through the changes in the music industry. The industry had plenty of corruption always but now its saturated with coprorate greed and incompetence.


Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #7 on: November 26, 2020, 00:56:26
@CGHound  reading your post reminded me of something a read a couple of years ago from a music blogger, He was writing about a person who

kept on trying to get him to review his songs. One song had like a billion hits on the soundcloud. He thought maybe he might have been wrong and

gave another listen .... the song still sucked. Then he went on to expose (or turn people onto) these services that get you listeners.  It still doesn't

change the song though. 
Vince


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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #8 on: November 26, 2020, 02:14:13
@CGHound  reading your post reminded me of something a read a couple of years ago from a music blogger, He was writing about a person who

kept on trying to get him to review his songs. One song had like a billion hits on the soundcloud. He thought maybe he might have been wrong and

gave another listen .... the song still sucked. Then he went on to expose (or turn people onto) these services that get you listeners.  It still doesn't

change the song though.

A lot of rock royalty are complaining about the scumbaggery of the music industry but they are doing nothing about it. You'd think that folks like Steven Tyler, The Eagles,  Pete Townsend, Ringo, McCartney etc.. would pool their funds and start an ethical streaming service that treats artists and adverisers fairly.


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Re: The Music Industry - The Good - The Bad - And the Ugly
Reply #9 on: November 26, 2020, 03:46:31
It's sad that music has become a commodity for the corporations but it has.  When all farmers have a bumper crop the price drops. That's why in the US we used to have subsidies for our farmers we still sorta do.

There is something about music that seems to transcend the normal perception. It's like it's language transcends time itself and has its basis in some sort of unseen realm. While I am not a religious person I do think about the fact that western music has 12 notes and the Zodiac has 12 signs and Christ had 12 apostles.  I also think about the emotional affect the modes have on most humans. Music has a powerful affect on plants and animals.  I have a friend who is a mathematician who told me that notes and chords have geometric patterns. Music seems to be a language closely related to the electromagnetic spectrum and while I don't think music in and of itself will lead to any Stephen Hawking type revelations I suspect learning why it does what it does to us may lead science to perhaps how the brain works and what conciousness really is.

I hate seeing the language and art form of music exploited by greedy people and treated like a hooker.