• My recent singing discovery "The Tenor Arch"
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My recent singing discovery "The Tenor Arch"
on: August 11, 2019, 12:18:26
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 01:35:54 by MrBouzouki »
Singing is a very personal experience but I wanted to put something out about what I term

 "The Tenor Arch" 

that I discovered almost by accident.

It might help male singers like it's helped me to visualise mouth positions before singing higher notes. I'm not sure if it applies to ladies in the same way.

I mentioned this to our choir MD who said that it was a good way of visualising it. He's been a vocal coach so he knows his stuff.

Please forgive me with this ... it fascinates me. I'm in no way an expert about any of this but I have done some research on the subject.

I wanted to use a graphic to explain how it feels for me in my mouth as I sing different higher notes (Tenor ... head voice).

It's very much a 'how it feels thing' I'm not sure what is happening anatomically but all you can go with is sensations.

The notes in question are Eb4,  F#4 and Ab4

Eb4


F#4


Ab4


For context Tenor C5 (Think Pavarotti) is four semi-tones higher than the Ab4

It was a small phrase from our last season's choir repertoire song "You Raise Me Up" ... "I am Strong" and it had to be in full voice really and not flip into falsetto.  For this more classical piece I imagine the larynx was lowered a bit too but let's not go there.  ;D ;D ;D

Singing these ascending notes, the shape of my mouth changes now from circular to progressive arched and narrower. This is not just a 2D thing, there is also a feeling of forward placement. I've described that in the past as the feeling of a 'pebble of air' moving forward in your mouth. 

Another way of thinking about it to think of putting a whole cupcake in your mouth at once. Once it's in your mouth it starts to get bigger so your mouth has to open wider and the roof of your mouth has the sensation of upward pressure.

Ha Ha .... I'm not sure if any of this is any use to anybody but I wanted to put it out there. It's a very imperfect science (well it's not a science at all) with various people expounding different takes on the subject.

Playing around with this sort of stuff, learning about breath support to sing through phrases (not using all your air too quickly) and singing on the vowel sound are just some of the factors that have improved my singing ability. That and regular singing of course.

I hope It might be useful for singers, especially male, in singer higher notes.     



 

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Re: My recent singing discovery "The Tenor Arch"
Reply #1 on: August 16, 2019, 02:47:34
Thanks for posting this @MrBouzouki .Its fun to play the three  notes together in different order.. singing along I can feel the mouth shape change you are talking about. Singing tenor in choir was a stretch for me, a good one, that helps now especially with harmony recording.

Robert