• Understanding Drumming - The Origins of the Shuffle Groove ( 26 Rudiments )
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« Last Edit: September 12, 2019, 08:56:10 by MrBouzouki »
So as songwriters, unless we are drummers, we often struggle understanding 'real' drumming and drum-beats in general

Well this is an interesting YouTube video I watched on the YouTube Rick Beato channel.

It might be particularly interesting for drummers, but also anybody who wondered about the historical origins of the shuffle groove, the 'Purdie' Shuffle, Jeff Porcaro's amazing groove from Toto's classic hit "Rosanna" etc.



If you want to go further - these are the 26 rudiments mentioned in the original video

http://drummersbook.com/26-rudiments/

and here is Micheal Carvin demonstrating them all

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLReW5Mv77OKCROXYqr99zk3T494Sukq5D

"Love and Life is all about connections"


Thanks @MrBouzouki   I try to "flesh out" my stuff with drum tracks from time to time with little success.

Vince


"Understanding Drumming" …. well, even that title is kind questionable.

I have so much respect for drummers and percussionists. Now seeing what my son goes through - more than ever. Drumming is more than an instrument. It's like a cult.  ;) I do like watching videos about drumming but I'll never be able to understand it the way real drummers understand it.

In 25 years of playing "professionally" ( if you can call it that) I've never met a self-taught drummer who could do what I would want/need performance-wise. It's so specialized. Most have a college degree or significant years of lessons with top drum teachers.

I wonder what @Bluedusksun , @Dutchbeat , @Pleudoniem  or other drumming kitcheners think. Sorry if I'm changing the subject away from the video @MrBouzouki  .  :)
 
Bill
Songwriter, Keyboards, Arranger, Producer & Engineer for November Sound

November Sound is based on the Mother, Father & Son musical trio of Melissa, Bill & Will. I'm the father so anything I post will have my wife singing and/or my son playing percussion.


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Not at all @Bill from November Sound - I found the video and info interesting so I wanted to share.

I'm fascinated about the history of music in addition to trying to create it and how certain things developed like they did.

The idea that the 'organic' shuffle rhythm is being lost from modern 'gridded' music produced via a DAW is perhaps another aspect of the advent of technology in music. Or maybe it's just lost from mainstream perception and will always remain, practiced by a few who understand it and in certain genres.




So, yeah, this guy has some really good rudiment technique! … at least to me …. Will would know better.
Very true about how impossible it is to program a swing or a shuffle!  :)
 

The history part is kind of warped  … to fit a Caucasian worldview. Remember - as amazing as the Beatles were - Rick Beato seems to always go back to them - they essentially took the African American music and sold back to us with a white face. They did this very effectively.
I feel like we should try to give credit where it is due.
Those rhythms (shuffle, bo diddley, etc. ) from my understanding are based on thousands of years of West African drumming.

A few comments on youtube say it better than I can -   

stxxcrisler:
"Shuffle came from trains? So, there's no 12/8 grooves with a shuffle from before the industrial revolution? I'm not a musicologist, but that sounds highly unlikely to be true. You mention clave, but without exploring the 12/8 clave (African Bembe bell pattern), which is the defining characteristic of the BoDiddly shuffle."

Massud Kiburi-Cunningham:
"6/8 rhythms arrived in the U.S with West-African culture .. and Jazz originates from a West-African approach to European Classical Music + Caribbean Basin marches  - i.e. "second-line" music.. Love the Channel Rick,  But this was just inaccurate ! You can hear Rhythms divided into three, if you step into any "Black" church in the U.S.. Really not hard to find accuracy, IF YOU ACTUALLY WANT TO FIND THE ANSWERS... 

Would LOVE anyone to offer their thoughts, here. Thanks !

p.s Waltzes are FORSURE a Western European import.. but laying down two cycles of 6 into a 4 count bar creates "swing" ; the basis for all shuffles described in the video"


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« Last Edit: September 17, 2019, 10:03:11 by MrBouzouki »
Cheers @Bill from November Sound ... here are some further thoughts.

I'm sure virtually all rhythms have been done in the past, especially at a tribal level. Our race as a whole has been around for a while.
You have a smaller subset of possibilities with drum patterns compared to musical note playing, especially those than extend the human voice.
Also the technical changes in instruments gives a whole new experience to creating sounds. Even changes to the drum kit has allowed new forms of rhythmic expression, unimaginable in the past for a single player to achieve.

As always with these things, people discover stuff which is then overlaid by the next batch of people who plagiarise or "discover it" all over again. 

"What goes around, comes around"

If you are talking about the recent advent of Western popular music, which he was, then the idea of a generation of American born, ex slaves, separated from their homeland by time and circumstances, finding a new way to express themselves via 'their music ' seems quite plausible to me. Socio-economic factors like being poor share-croppers necessitates invention, like re-using ex war brass instruments, cigar-box guitars and fiddles, wash-tub bass etc. to further express themselves whilst singing about their lot in life or their faith.

How much was passed on from generation to generation is interesting. For example, the forerunner of the 'washtub bass'

The ground-bow or a earth-bow is a single-string bow-shaped folk musical instrument, classified as a chordophone. It is known in cultures of equatorial [1] and south[2] Africa, and in other cultures with African roots. It consists of a flexible stick planted into the ground (possibly a stripped sapling or a branch[3]), with a string from its free end to a resonator of some kind based on a pit in the ground.[4] It looks like a game trap or a child toy, therefore its distribution over Africa used to be overlooked. Hornbostel (1933) classified is in the category of harps, although it has combined characteristics of a harp and a musical bow.

Once you have a resonant string, you have a basic pulse that can add-on to any rhythmic clapping or crude drums.

I don't think anybody in the video was implying different rhythms didn't exist before then, just that when trains did arrive, there was a cultural impact and the sights and sounds of that time will have integrated into that generations life experiences. So it seems quite plausible to me that certain 'feels' developed as a result. Maybe not original in that sense, but right for the moment.

America has had so many different types of migrant that musically it was, and still is, a musical melting pot.

The underlying thing I take out of this is that styles of music, including the use of certain rhythmic patterns in those styles, is often tied up in cultural identity, be it racial, socio-economic or just the advent of new ways to create new and interesting sounds. I find that fascinating.



xx
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